Parents are the #1 reason kids don't drink alcohol or use other drugs.

....and the good news is, most kids in Mundelein are Drug & Alcohol free!

Education Alone

Education is not enough to deter teens from drinking as they enter difficult social transition to adulthood, because there are many pressures and opportunities to drink. Parents who are actively involved can have a powerful influence on their child's decision to remain drug-free.

Remain drug-Free

How parents can help their children remain drug-free in 9 simple steps.

1. Explain the risks

2. Talk early and often

3. Set clear rules

4. Know your children's friends

5. Monitor children's activities

Peers

Students with high-refusal-assertiveness skills are less likely to drink underage. Help your child decide on good ways to say "no" and practice them often in role-play situations.

Start Talking Before They Start Drinking Alcohol or Using Other Drugs

Education alone is not enough to deter teens from drinking as they enter the difficult social transition to adulthood because there are many pressures and opportunities to drink. Research shows parents can have a powerful influence on their child's decision to remain drug-free. Parents may not realize that children say parental disapproval of underage drinking and other drug use is the key reason they have chosen not to use alcohol.  Mixed messages, and unclear family rules and expectations also leave children more vulnerable to underage drinking.

How parents can help their children remain DRUG-FREE

Explain the risks

Know your children's friends

Be involved

Stay in contact

Eat dinner together

Talk early and often

Monitor children's activities

Make alcohol unavailable

Set clear rules

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Learn and explain the risks of underage drinking. Emphasize that drinking alcohol is not a "rite of passage" but a dangerous drug for a teen brain.

Get to know your children's friends and their parents. Help them choose friends who support your family rules.

Develop close bonding experiences and have daily positive interactions with your child. Express love often.

Studies show children are more likely to drink between the hours of 3:00-6:00 pm, when unsupervised by parents. Give your kids a call.

Studies show that kids who eat dinner with their family 5-7 times per week are 33 percent less likely to drink alcohol underage.

In Illinois, surveys indicate some kids binge drink in the sixth grade, and a few start even earlier.

Always know where your children are, whom they are with and what they are doing. For example: "If alcohol is at a party, call me and I'll come and get you."

Ensure that alcohol is not available to your child at home or from others when your child is away. Provide an alcohol free place for your teen and his or her friends to hang out.

Set clear rules about no alcohol use. Be specific: "Absolutely no underage drinking in our family."

*Information from the Lake County Underage Drinking and Drug Prevention Task Force Spring 2015 Newspaper insert (www.drugfreelakecounty.org)

Peers'

influence on alcohol use

Students with high-refusal-assertiveness skills are less likely to drink underage. Decide on good ways to say "no" and practice them often in role-play situations. Some ideas are:

"No thanks. Drinking is not my thing."

"No thanks. I need all the brain cells I've got."

"No thanks. I've only got one brain. Why would I want to trash it?"

"No thanks. Drinking before your brain is developed can dumb yourself down."

Stay Out of My Room Display Description

The teen bedroom can be a place for signs of drug use

Drugs and paraphernalia

Objects hidden in plain sight

Signs and Symptoms of Teen Drug Use

Here are items that may be found in the bedroom of teenagers who might be using drugs.

Examples of places where drugs are hidden:

Withdrawn Behavior

Mood Swings

  Objects for marijuana: smoking pipes, papers, cigarettes, soda cans, pouches, clips, filters.

  Inhalants: paint, markers, lighter fluid, hair spray, computer dusting spray, cooking spray are sometimes used among young people to get high.

  Alcohol: small bottles of liquor that are easy to hide, liquor in popular flavors like Buzzballs and “ready to go” shot glasses.

  Anything that may indicate association with drugs or use as incense, matches, bottle caps, lighters, etc.

  Lighters, candles, posters, magnets with alcohol brands, spoons, straws, surgical mask.

  Under the bed or inside the pages of books or in CD cases.

•        Hallowing out items such as hairspray, deodorant, pop cans, markers or pens to hide pills or drugs.

  Using photo clips or hair clips as roach clips to smoke the end of a joint.

  Stashing drugs in a camera or glasses case.

  Replacing water for vodka in a water bottle.

•         Inside drawers or taped to the bottom of the drawer.

•         Inside the lining of a coat, pillow, chair, etc.

•         Inside a backpack, sleeping bag, blanket, coat pocket.

  Spends less time with the family

•       Spends more time alone in the bedroom

  Irritable and/or sensitive

•        Increases arguments with siblings

Changes in daily routine:

  Eats more or less than usual

•       Sleeps more or less than usual

Changes in physical appearance

Rebellious behavior

  Doesn't return home when they should

•        Leaves without permission

  You don't know where your child is or who his/her friends are

  You notice money or valuables missing

  You notice alcohol or medicine missing

•       Your child is defensive when you ask about alcohol/drugs

  Smells like alcohol or marijuana

•        Doesn't maintain good hygiene

Parent Tips and Resources

Social Problems

  Changes in friends or shows little interest in his/her friends from always

•        Is rebellious with authority figures

  Little interest in activities that he/she used to enjoy

You can influence your child to make healthy choices:

  Continue listening to your child

•       Continue talking with your child. Include household rules in conversations.

  Continue reinforcing the rules about no drinking alcohol, using drugs or smoking cigarettes.

  Continue talking about the consequences for not following the rules regarding not drinking alcohol or using other drugs

  Continue monitoring your child: Always know where they are, who they're with, when they'll be home and who's driving.

•       Continue praising your child. They need to hear positive feedback from you frequently.

Remember that the majority of teen in Mundelein are alcohol and drug free.

If you think your child is using drugs, don't hesitate to get help. Call Nicasa at (847) 546-6450 or visit www.nicasa.org for more information.

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